Finding a diet that is right for you

By: Ellen Fisher MS RD LDN

Each year Google reveals the top diet searches of the year. For 2016, those diets included the DASH diet, the pizza diet, and the taco diet.

All diets have one goal in mind: to reduce calories so that you lose weight.

A professor of nutrition at Harvard recently conducted a study published in the New England Journal of Medicine in which he concluded that “reduced calorie diets that are successful in causing weight loss can emphasize a range of fat, protein, and carbohydrate compositions that have beneficial effects on risk factors for cardiovascular disease and diabetes.”

Wait. What does that mean?

What it means is that the same diet may not work for everyone, BUT in order for a diet to work, it does need to contain fewer calories than what you would eat regularly.

But don’t just search on Google for your next diet … talk to your doctor or your health coach, too. In addition, think about your eating habits, what your barriers are (including budget and time), your food preferences, and your health conditions.

Remember, any diet can work in the short term but you want to make sure your choices are safe, sustainable, and something you can stick with. Changing your diet is not about making one BIG change or sticking to just one food or eliminating one food group: it’s about making little changes over time and then making those changes stick.

UPMC Health Plan members can learn more about adopting healthy lifestyle changes by calling a health coach at 1-855-217-8762.

 

Resources:

New England Journal of Medicine: http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa0804748

Coconut oil: Not all it’s cracked up to be

By: Lilly Hutchings, ACSM EP-C

Coconut oil has taken the diet industry by storm with claims to help with heart and thyroid conditions, diabetes, and even weight loss. The aisles of your local grocery store and your social media timeline may be flooded with coconut oil in food, skin care, and hair care products. Coconut oil has become so popular that some are even using it in their coffee! But does coconut oil offer health benefits, or just hype? Does research support the claims behind this increasingly popular oil?

Coconut oil comes from the meat of the coconut, which is then pressed and slightly heated. Your first thought might be that because it is directly from a coconut, this oil is healthier than others such as olive or vegetable oil. I mean, it is from a coconut, so why wouldn’t it be healthy?

Like all oils, coconut oil is fat. And like all fats, there are healthy and unhealthy types. Healthy fats are unsaturated, monounsaturated, and polyunsaturated fats. You can find these in food sources such as avocados, nuts, seeds, salmon, and oils like olive and vegetable. Unhealthy fats are saturated fats, which are foods like butter, margarine, ice cream, and some cheeses. Food sources that are high in saturated fat are directly linked to obesity and heart disease, and also tend to be solid at room temperature.

So is coconut oil healthy or unhealthy?

Well, despite the belief that coconut can cure obesity and prevent diseases, there is no scientific evidence to support that claim. Take a look at this chart below. It compares commonly used oils and each of their saturated and unsaturated fat content. See where coconut oil ranks? Yikes!

According to the American Heart Association, an individual consuming 2,000 calories per day should limit their saturated fat content to 16 g per day, which is only about one tablespoon of coconut oil! A diet high in coconut oil could likely lead to obesity, heart health problems, as well as increase our “bad” cholesterol (LDL).

Sometimes the media can show us things that seem too good to be true — and most of the time, they are. But that doesn’t mean you are never allowed to eat coconut oil again! Eat foods like coconut oil in moderation, and substitute with a healthier option when possible.

 

Resources:

http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/Conditions/Cholesterol/PreventionTreatmentofHighCholesterol/Know-Your-Fats_UCM_305628_Article.jsp#

Mint, apple, and pomegranate salad recipe

Mint, apple, and pomegranate salad recipe

Are you looking for a delicious snack that’s easy to make, inexpensive, refreshing, and delicious? Then look no further than this apple, mint, and pomegranate salad. Make a small batch for yourself, or multiply the recipe for the perfect healthy party snack!

Ingredients

  • 5 Honeycrisp apples
  • 4-6 leaves of fresh mint
  • 5 Tbsp. Lime Juice
  • 1 pomegranate

Directions

  1. Slice the apples into desired cubes or slices and place in a bowl.
  2. Mince mint and sprinkle over the apples.
  3. Add the seeds of one pomegranate into the bowl.
  4. Drizzle lime juice on top (add more for taste if needed).
  5. Stir and refrigerate until served.

Mint, apple, and pomegranate salad recipe

Nutrition:

  • Serving Size: ½ cup
  • Calories: 93
  • Fat: .03 g
  • Carbohydrate: 27 g
  • Fiber: 4.1 g
  • Protein: .05 g

Is coffee bad for you?

By: Lilly Hutchings, ACSM EP-C

Over the years coffee has received a bad reputation, with some people believing that coffee causes an increase of heart and metabolic disease, overall mortality rate, and even cancer. But more recently, news came out that coffee does the complete opposite and actually increases your health and quality of life! This could be extremely confusing for anyone. Should you get ready to throw away your coffee pot or stock up on all the different roasts and flavors offered at the grocery store?

For all you caffeine gurus out there, having a large cup of coffee every morning may be a ritual. It may even mean life or death (of mental sanity, that is).

So what’s the verdict? Is coffee good or bad for your health?

Studies have indeed shown both positive and negative side effects. Let’s start with the benefits of drinking coffee.

Benefits of drinking coffee

  • Lowers the risk of cardiovascular disease
  • Minimizes cognitive decline associated with aging and reduces the risk of Alzheimer’s disease
  • Increases awareness and decreases fatigue
  • Acutely increases your resting metabolic rate (metabolism)
  • Reduces you risk of cancer and Parkinson’s disease
  • Lowers the risk of type 2 diabetes
  • Fights against free radicals within the body
  • Acutely improves vascular function (circulation)

But just like anything, too much of one thing can be bad. Non-habitual caffeine drinkers, tobacco smokers, individuals who are inactive or individuals who consume more than 200-300 mg of caffeine per day may experience the following negative effects from drinking coffee:

Disadvantages of drinking coffee

  • Acute increase in blood pressure in non-habitual drinkers
  • Stimulation of urination
  • Disrupted sleeping patterns if consumed close to bedtime
  • High dose (over 300 mg at one time) can cause an increase of anxiety
  • GI upset or discomfort

So what’s the bottom line? There are both advantages and disadvantages associated with coffee consumption, but the benefits very much outweigh the risks. Moderation is key to a healthy lifestyle, and this also includes coffee drinking.

 

Resources:

http://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/nutrition-and-healthy-eating/expert-answers/coffee-and-health/faq-20058339

http://newsroom.heart.org/news/moderate-coffee-drinking-may-be-linked-to-reduced-risk-of-death

http://www.webmd.com/food-recipes/features/coffee-new-health-food#1

http://www.eatright.org/resource/health/wellness/preventing-illness/benefits-of-java#.WG1adPDVlFw.email

Butternut squash chicken taco bowls recipe

I love tacos, but week after week they can get boring and stale. This week I decided to incorporate some new flavors for an exciting twist on a traditional taco bowl. For those of you who are vegetarians, take this recipe and incorporate additional veggies in place of the chicken. The more veggies the merrier!

Ingredients

  • 2 cups rice
  • 2 cups cubed butternut squash
  • 2 cups cubed zucchini (optional for added veggies)
  • 2-4 medium pieces of skinless boneless chicken breast (or tenders)
  • 1 red onion
  • 8 oz. of guacamole (homemade or packaged)
  • 2 Tbsp. olive oil
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  • Taco seasoning to taste (for chicken)
  • 1 cup chopped cilantro
  • Optional added protein: 1 can of black beans

Directions

  1. Wash and chop vegetables; in a small bowl drizzle a teaspoon of olive oil and toss.
  2. On a baking pan separate chopped onion, butternut squash, and zucchini for baking and preheat oven to 350 degrees. Once the oven is warm, place in the oven for 12-15 minutes until cooked or edges are browned.
  3. In a stovetop pan spread a teaspoon of olive oil and add chicken. Brown until cooked through.
  4. Once chicken is brown, add in taco seasoning to taste.
  5. Remove vegetables for cooling and prepare rice (either in a rice cooker or over stovetop).
  6. Once the rice is finished, remove from pan and add cilantro.
  7. Assemble the bowls by layering the chicken with ½ cup rice, squash, (optional black beans and zucchini), and roasted onion. Top your bowl with guacamole and garnish with cilantro leaves.

Nutrition

Makes 4 servings

484 calories, carbohydrate 36g, protein 31g, fat 11g per serving

Golden Summer Squash & Corn Soup Recipe

Author: EatingWell Test Kitchen
Photographer: Ken Burris

 

Pureed summer squash makes a delicious base for this summery squash and corn soup. Start your meal with the soup or enjoy it as a light lunch. Fresh thyme and briny feta cheese give it fabulous flavor. For a variation, try the soup with any herb you have on hand or goat cheese in place of feta.

Ingredients:

  • 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1 medium shallot, chopped
  • 2 medium summer squash (about 1 pound), diced
  • 3 teaspoons chopped fresh herbs, such as thyme or oregano, divided
  • 1 14-ounce can reduced-sodium chicken broth or vegetable broth
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1 cup fresh corn kernels (from 1 large ear; see Tip)
  • 1 teaspoon lemon juice
  • 1/4 cup crumbled feta cheese

Directions

  1. Heat oil in a large saucepan over medium heat. Add shallot and cook, stirring, 1 minute. Add squash and 1 teaspoon herbs and cook, stirring occasionally, until the squash starts to soften, 3 to 5 minutes.
  2. Add broth and salt; bring to a boil. Reduce heat to a simmer and cook until the squash is soft and mostly translucent, about 5 minutes more. Transfer to a blender and puree until smooth. (Use caution when pureeing hot liquids.) Return the soup to the pan and stir in corn. Bring to a simmer over medium heat and cook, stirring occasionally, until the corn is tender, 3 to 5 minutes more. Remove from the heat; stir in lemon juice. Serve garnished with the remaining 2 teaspoons herbs and feta.

Recipe Tips & Notes

  • Kitchen Tip: To remove corn from the cob, stand an uncooked ear of corn on its stem end in a shallow bowl and slice the kernels off with a sharp, thin-bladed knife. If making a soup, after cutting off the kernels, you can reverse the knife and use the dull side to press down the length of the ear to push out the rest of the corn and its milk.

Nutrition

Per serving: 109 calories; 6 g fat (2 g sat, 3 g mono); 6 mg cholesterol; 12 g carbohydrate; 0 g added sugars; 5 g total sugars; 5 g protein; 2 g fiber; 462 mg sodium; 491 mg potassium.

Nutrition Bonus: Vitamin C (40% daily value)

1 Carbohydrate Serving(s)

Exchanges: 1/2 starch, 1 vegetable, 1 fat

Scaling Disclaimer: EatingWell recipes are tested extensively in the EatingWell Test Kitchen. EatingWell cannot guarantee a recipe that has been scaled to make a different number of servings from the original. Also note that scaling only applies to the ingredient measurements: no adjustment is made to the recipe instructions, so pan sizes and cooking times and ingredient amounts referred to in the text of the recipe only apply to the original number of servings.

Gluten-Free Disclaimer: Our nutritionists have verified that the recipes marked as gluten-free do not contain wheat, rye, barley or oats. However, many processed foods, such as broths, soy sauce and other condiments, may contain hidden sources of gluten. If a recipe calls for a packaged (e.g., canned) ingredient, we recommend that you carefully read the label to make sure you pick a brand that does not contain a hidden source of gluten. Also, please note that while a recipe may be marked as “gluten-free,” the serving suggestions that accompany it may contain gluten.

Peach & Blueberry Cobbler Recipe

Author: Virginia Willis
Photographer: Ken Burris

 

This is a healthier version of a traditional cobbler, with canola oil in place of some of the butter and whole-wheat flour instead of all-purpose flour. Unlike more classic biscuit-topped cobblers, the peaches and blueberries are nestled into a tender batter that swells around the fruit as it bakes. Other fruits may be substituted. It’s especially beautiful when baked in and served right from a cast-iron skillet.

Ingredients

  • 3 tablespoons unsalted butter
  • 3 tablespoons canola oil
  • 1 cup whole-wheat flour
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1 cup reduced-fat milk
  • 1/2 cup sugar
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 3 ripe but firm peaches (about 1 pound), pitted and sliced into eighths, or 3 1/2 cups frozen
  • 2 cups (1 pint) fresh or frozen blueberries

Directions

  1. Preheat oven to 350°F.
  2. Place butter and oil in a 12-inch cast-iron skillet or a 9-by-13-inch baking pan. Heat in the oven until melted and fragrant, 5 to 7 minutes.
  3. Meanwhile, combine flour, baking powder and salt in a large bowl. Add milk, sugar and vanilla; stir to combine.
  4. Add the melted butter mixture to the batter and stir to combine. Pour the batter into the hot pan. Spoon peaches and blueberries evenly over the batter.
  5. Return the pan to the oven and bake until the top of the cobbler is browned and the batter around the fruit is completely set, 50 minutes to 1 hour. Remove to a wire rack to cool for at least 15 minutes. Serve warm.

Nutrition

Per serving: 182 calories; 8 g fat (3 g sat, 3 g mono); 11 mg cholesterol; 26 g carbohydrate; 7 g added sugars; 3 g protein; 3 g fiber; 212 mg sodium; 140 mg potassium.

2 Carbohydrate Serving(s)

Exchanges: 1/2 fruit, 1 1/2 carbohydrate (other), 1 1/2 fat

Scaling Disclaimer: EatingWell recipes are tested extensively in the EatingWell Test Kitchen. EatingWell cannot guarantee a recipe that has been scaled to make a different number of servings from the original. Also note that scaling only applies to the ingredient measurements: no adjustment is made to the recipe instructions, so pan sizes and cooking times and ingredient amounts referred to in the text of the recipe only apply to the original number of servings.

Fettuccine Alfredo Recipe

Author: EatingWell Test Kitchen
Photographer: Ken Burris

 

Alfredo di Lello, the Roman restaurateur who created his signature sauc.e in the 1920s, might be startled to find this streamlined version that still tastes rich enough to satisfy those deep creamy-pasta cravings. The addition of zucchini boosts the nutritional profile. And when cut into thin strands, it can be twirled gracefully on a fork.

Ingredients

  • 3/4 cup vegetable broth or reduced-sodium chicken broth (see Tips for Two)
  • 4 large cloves garlic, peeled
  • 4 ounces whole-wheat fettuccine
  • 1 small zucchini, cut into matchsticks
  • 2 teaspoons cornstarch, mixed with 1 tablespoon water
  • 2 tablespoons reduced-fat sour cream
  • Pinch of freshly grated nutmeg
  • 1/8 teaspoon freshly ground pepper, or to taste
  • 3/4 cup freshly grated Parmesan cheese, divided
  • 1 tablespoon chopped fresh parsley

Directions

  1. Bring a large saucepan of water to a boil. Combine broth and garlic cloves in a small saucepan; bring to a boil over high heat. Cover, reduce heat to a simmer and cook until the garlic cloves are soft, about 15 minutes.
  2. After the garlic has simmered about 10 minutes, cook fettuccine in the boiling water, stirring often, for 8 minutes. Drop in zucchini and cook until the fettuccine is just tender, about 1 minute more.
  3. Meanwhile, transfer the garlic and broth to a blender. Process until the mixture is smooth, about 1 minute. (Use caution when blending hot liquids; see Tip.) Return the mixture to the pot and bring to a simmer over medium-high heat. Add cornstarch mixture; whisk it until slightly thickened, about 15 seconds. Remove from the heat and whisk in sour cream, nutmeg and pepper. Return the pot to very low heat to keep the sauce warm. (Do not boil.)
  4. Drain the pasta and place in a large bowl. Add the sauce and 1/2 cup Parmesan; toss to coat well. Sprinkle with parsley and serve immediately, passing the remaining 1/4 cup Parmesan separately.

Recipe Tips & Notes

  • Tips for Two: Leftover canned broth keeps up to 5 days in the refrigerator or up to 3 months in your freezer. Leftover broth in aseptic packages keep for up to 1 week in the refrigerator. Add to soups, sauces, stews; use for cooking rice and grains; add a little when reheating leftovers to prevent them from drying out.
  • Pureeing hot liquids: Hot liquids can splatter out of a blender when it’s turned on. To avoid this, remove the center piece of the lid. Loosely cover the hole with a folded kitchen towel and turn the blender on. Better airflow will keep the contents from spewing all over the kitchen—and yourself.

Nutrition

Per serving: 385 calories; 11 g fat (6 g sat, 3 g mono); 33 mg cholesterol; 53 g carbohydrate; 21 g protein; 8 g fiber; 627 mg sodium; 382 mg potassium.

Nutrition Bonus: Calcium (39% daily value), Magnesium (26% dv), Vitamin C (25% dv), Vitamin A (20% dv), Zinc (18% dv)

3 Carbohydrate Serving(s)

Exchanges: 3 starch, 1 vegetable, 1 high fat meat

Scaling Disclaimer: EatingWell recipes are tested extensively in the EatingWell Test Kitchen. EatingWell cannot guarantee a recipe that has been scaled to make a different number of servings from the original. Also note that scaling only applies to the ingredient measurements: no adjustment is made to the recipe instructions, so pan sizes and cooking times and ingredient amounts referred to in the text of the recipe only apply to the original number of servings.

Spaghetti Squash Lasagna with Broccolini Recipe

Author: EatingWell Test Kitchen
Photographer: Peter Ardito

In this low-carb spaghetti squash lasagna recipe, garlicky broccolini, spaghetti squash and cheese are combined for a healthy take on a favorite casserole. This bakes right in the squash shells for a fun presentation. Serve with a big Caesar salad and some warm and crusty whole-grain bread.

Ingredients

  • 1 2 1/2- to 3-pound spaghetti squash, halved lengthwise and seeded
  • 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1 bunch broccolini, chopped
  • 4 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1/4 teaspoon crushed red pepper (optional)
  • 2 tablespoons water
  • 1 cup shredded part-skim mozzarella cheese, divided
  • 1/4 cup shredded Parmesan cheese, divided
  • 3/4 teaspoon Italian seasoning
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground pepper

Directions

  1. Position racks in upper and lower thirds of oven; preheat to 450°F.
  2. Place squash cut-side down in a microwave-safe dish; add 2 tablespoons water. Microwave, uncovered, on High until the flesh is tender, about 10 minutes. (Alternatively, place squash halves cut-side down on a rimmed baking sheet. Bake in a 400°F oven until the squash is tender, 40 to 50 minutes.)
  3. Meanwhile, heat oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add broccolini, garlic and red pepper (if using); cook, stirring frequently, for 2 minutes. Add water and cook, stirring, until the broccolini is tender, 3 to 5 minutes more. Transfer to a large bowl.
  4. Use a fork to scrape the squash from the shells into the bowl. Place the shells in a broiler-safe baking pan or on a baking sheet. Stir 3/4 cup mozzarella, 2 tablespoons Parmesan, Italian seasoning, salt and pepper into the squash mixture. Divide it between the shells; top with the remaining 1/4 cup mozzarella and 2 tablespoons Parmesan.
  5. Bake on the lower rack for 10 minutes. Move to the upper rack, turn the broiler to high and broil, watching carefully, until the cheese starts to brown, about 2 minutes.

Nutrition

Per serving: 194 calories; 11 g fat (5 g sat, 5 g mono); 20 mg cholesterol; 13 g carbohydrate; 0 g added sugars; 4 g total sugars; 12 g protein; 2 g fiber; 587 mg sodium; 334 mg potassium.

Nutrition Bonus: Vitamin C (79% daily value), Calcium (33% dv), Vitamin A (23% dv)

1 Carbohydrate Serving(s)

Exchanges: 1/2 starch, 1/2 vegetable, 1/2 lean meat, 1 medium-fat meat, 1 fat

Scaling Disclaimer: EatingWell recipes are tested extensively in the EatingWell Test Kitchen. EatingWell cannot guarantee a recipe that has been scaled to make a different number of servings from the original. Also note that scaling only applies to the ingredient measurements: no adjustment is made to the recipe instructions, so pan sizes and cooking times and ingredient amounts referred to in the text of the recipe only apply to the original number of servings.

Gluten-Free Disclaimer: Our nutritionists have verified that the recipes marked as gluten-free do not contain wheat, rye, barley or oats. However, many processed foods, such as broths, soy sauce and other condiments, may contain hidden sources of gluten. If a recipe calls for a packaged (e.g., canned) ingredient, we recommend that you carefully read the label to make sure you pick a brand that does not contain a hidden source of gluten. Also, please note that while a recipe may be marked as “gluten-free,” the serving suggestions that accompany it may contain gluten.

Asparagus & Salmon Spring Rolls Recipe

Author: Victoria Abbott Riccardi
Photographer: Ken Burris

 

These spring rolls are filled with smoked salmon, tender-crisp asparagus and plenty of fresh herbs. Spring rolls look impressive when you put them out for a party, but they are actually easy to make. To simplify the process, lay out all the ingredients you need to make the rolls near your work surface before you begin.

Ingredients

Spring Rolls

  • 24 thick or 36 thin asparagus spears (about 2 pounds)
  • 2 3- to 4-ounce packages smoked wild salmon
  • 12 8-inch rice-paper wrappers (see Notes)
  • 1 ripe avocado, cut into 24 slices
  • 1 cup shredded carrot
  • 1/2 cup chopped fresh basil
  • 1/2 cup chopped fresh mint

Dipping Sauce

  • 1/3 cup reduced-sodium soy sauce
  • 2 tablespoons orange juice
  • 2 tablespoons lemon juice
  • 2 tablespoons mirin (see Notes)
  • 1/4 teaspoon crushed red pepper, or more to taste

Directions

  1. To prepare spring rolls: Bring 1 inch of water to a boil in a large skillet. Trim asparagus spears to no longer than 6 inches; add to the boiling water. Partially cover and cook the asparagus until tender-crisp, about 3 minutes. Drain; refresh under cold water. Cut each spear in half lengthwise. Cut salmon slices into 12 strips no longer than 6 inches each.
  2. Soak one wrapper at a time in a shallow dish of very hot water until softened, about 30 seconds. Lift out, let excess water drip off and lay on a clean, dry cutting board.
  3. Center a strip of smoked salmon in the bottom third of the wrapper, leaving a 1-inch border on either side. Arrange 4 thick (or 6 thin) asparagus spear halves (overlapping as necessary) over the salmon. Top the asparagus with 2 avocado slices, 1 tablespoon shredded carrot and about 2 teaspoons each basil and mint. Fold the wrapper over the filling and roll into a tight cylinder, folding in the sides as you go. Repeat with the remaining wrappers and filling. Cut each finished roll in half.
  4. To prepare dipping sauce: Whisk soy sauce, orange juice, lemon juice, mirin and crushed red pepper in a small serving bowl. Serve the rolls with the sauce.

Recipe Tips & Notes

  • Notes: Rice-paper wrappers are translucent, round sheets made from rice flour. They need to briefly soak in warm water to make them soft and pliable before using. Find them in the Asian section of large supermarkets or at Asian food stores.
  • Mirin is a low-alcohol rice wine essential to Japanese cooking. Look for it in the supermarket with other Asian ingredients. An equal portion of dry sherry or white wine with a pinch of sugar may be substituted.

Recipe Nutrition

Per serving: 102 calories; 3 g fat (1 g sat, 2 g mono); 3 mg cholesterol; 13 g carbohydrate; 0 g added sugars; 2 g total sugars; 6 g protein; 2 g fiber; 370 mg sodium; 263 mg potassium.

Nutrition Bonus: Vitamin A (44% daily value), Folate (19% dv)

1 Carbohydrate Serving(s)

Exchanges: 1/2 starch, 1 vegetable, 1/2 lean meat, 1/2 fat

Scaling Disclaimer: EatingWell recipes are tested extensively in the EatingWell Test Kitchen. EatingWell cannot guarantee a recipe that has been scaled to make a different number of servings from the original. Also note that scaling only applies to the ingredient measurements: no adjustment is made to the recipe instructions, so pan sizes and cooking times and ingredient amounts referred to in the text of the recipe only apply to the original number of servings.

Gluten-Free Disclaimer: Our nutritionists have verified that the recipes marked as gluten-free do not contain wheat, rye, barley or oats. However, many processed foods, such as broths, soy sauce and other condiments, may contain hidden sources of gluten. If a recipe calls for a packaged (e.g., canned) ingredient, we recommend that you carefully read the label to make sure you pick a brand that does not contain a hidden source of gluten. Also, please note that while a recipe may be marked as “gluten-free,” the serving suggestions that accompany it may contain gluten.

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